Postpartum Depression Treatment

What is Postpartum Depression?

Known as “baby blues,” postpartum depression (PPD) is moderate to severe depression in a woman after she has given birth. Thus, it may occur soon after delivery or up to a year later. Most of the time, it occurs within the first 3 months after delivery. Without a doubt, it is a real mental health condition that requires proper diagnosis and postpartum treatment. Untreated postpartum depression is not only a problem for the mother’s health and quality of life, but can affect the well-being of the baby. This is according to the National Center for Biotechnology Information [1].

A woman’s hormones change after childbirth. Insomnia contributes to stress. Some depression and sadness after giving birth are normal, but if they persist for more than a few weeks, postpartum depression may be present. The levels of two hormones, estrogen, and progesterone, drop very quickly after a new mom gives birth. Thus, this change triggers mood swings.

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We Level Up Florida has advanced multi-diagnosis with corresponding multi-therapy programs for PPD Treatment

Those who present with mild symptoms often don’t get help. This can happen because they do not realize that what they’re experiencing is a real condition, or they may not connect their feelings with the childbirth experience.

Postpartum depression can be serious. Untreated, it may lead to long-lasting or recurring depressive symptoms. Motherhood brings in a variety of challenges that could impact both the mother and her family. Getting help for postpartum depression may seem difficult. However, it’s important to know that postpartum treatment is available.

Those who present with mild symptoms often don’t get help. This can happen because they do not realize that what they’re experiencing is a real condition, or they may not connect their feelings with the childbirth experience.

Postpartum depression can be serious. Untreated, it may lead to long-lasting or recurring depressive symptoms. Motherhood brings in a variety of challenges that could impact both the mother and her family. Getting help for postpartum depression may seem difficult. However, it’s important to know that postpartum treatment is available.

Risks and Causes of Postpartum Depression

  • Fluctuations in hormone levels.
  • History of mood disorders. Examples are major depression, bipolar disorder.
  • Lack of sleep.
  • Being under 25 years old
  • Current alcohol or drug use
  • Having an unplanned pregnancy, or experiencing mixed feelings about pregnancy.
  • Experiencing a stressful life event during pregnancy or delivery.
  • Having a close relative with depression, anxiety or other mental illness.
  • Poor relationship with a partner, or no partner.
  • Lower socioeconomic status, which can contribute to financial or housing issues.
  • Lacking social and/or emotional support.
  • History of substance use.

Postpartum Depression Symptoms

  • Depression
  • Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed
  • Changes in appetite
  • Trouble sleeping or sleeping too much
  • Increase in fatigue
  • Feeling worthless
  • Difficulty thinking or making decisions
  • Thoughts of death or suicide 
  • Crying for “no reason”
  • Lack of interest in the baby, not feeling bonded to the baby, or feeling very anxious about/around the baby
  • Feelings of being a bad mother
  • Lack of interest in the baby, not feeling bonded to the baby, or feeling very anxious about/around the baby

postpartum depression treatment
Postpartum depression treatment can be vital after birth, for cases with severe depression.

Postpartum Depression Treatment

Treatment and recovery time varies, depending on the severity of your depression and your individual needs. Postpartum depression (PPD) refers to a spectrum of illnesses experienced by some women after childbirth. Postpartum psychosis may occur when severe mood changes are accompanied by delusions or hallucinations, which may require hospitalization for treatment. Postpartum psychosis can be life-threatening for both the woman and her baby if it’s not recognized and treated early.

People with postpartum depression also report having these self-critical thoughts: “I’m not cut out for this.” “Something’s wrong with me.” PPD is more than just feeling sad, irritable or overwhelmed by new motherhood. It is time to seek help, postpartum depression treatment, if the feelings won’t go away or if they get worse.

Postpartum Depression Treatment starts with a diagnosis of postpartum depression is based on your symptoms and your medical and pregnancy history. It may help to talk through your concerns with a psychiatrist, psychologist, or other mental health professional.

Set realistic goals and respond to situations in a positive way. Postpartum depression should be diagnosed and treated promptly because it can affect you and your baby. Postpartum depression usually lasts from a few days to several weeks after delivery, and during treatment, your doctor may recommend an antidepressant. 

With proper postpartum depression treatment, the symptoms of PPD usually improve, it is important, too, to have real emotional support from friends, family, or your maternity team.

Benefits of Postpartum Depression Treatment

Once individuals have been diagnosed with PPD, they can pursue a variety of treatment options to help them achieve a healthy mind and body.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

  • It has been proven to be significantly effective for treating PPD
  • Involves identifying, understanding, and changing thinking and behavioral patterns to help individuals change the way they feel
  • Provides a hands-on, practical approach to problem-solving
  • Helps individuals:
    • Learn to control their thinking
    • Maintain a sense of control and self-confidence
    • Learn lifelong coping skills

Interpersonal Therapy

  • Addresses interpersonal issues influencing depression
  • Entails gathering information about the nature of a person’s depression and interpersonal experience
  • Involves 12 to 16 hours weekly sessions

Group Therapy

  • Draws upon a variety of cognitive-behavioral techniques, such as mindfulness, to help individuals develop skills for:
    • Regulating emotions
    • Tolerating distress
    • Managing relationships

Antidepressants

  • Medications affect the brain chemicals involved in mood regulation. A common class of antidepressants prescribed for PPD: selective-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as fluoxetine and sertraline.

7 Tips for a Healthier Lifestyle after Postpartum Depression Treatment

  • Incorporate exercise into your daily routine
  • Maintain a healthy diet and avoid alcohol
  • Set manageable expectations for daily activities
  • Build new relationships and foster existing ones
  • Discuss your feelings and experiences with family and friends
  • Don’t be ashamed to ask for or accept help from others
  • Seek advice about parenting from trusted individuals

How Long Does Postpartum Depression Last?

The postpartum period generally includes the first 4–6 weeks after birth, and many cases of PPD begin during that time. But PPD can also develop during pregnancy and up to 1 year after giving birth.

The Postpartum Period (PPD) is typically divided into four distinct stages: prenatal, perinatal, early postpartum, and late postpartum. The prenatal stage covers the pregnant woman’s entire pregnancy and extends through her delivery and the initial recovery period following childbirth. The perinatal stage begins with delivery and ends 7 days later with a visit from a healthcare provider who determines whether or not there are signs of serious maternal or infant problems.

The early postpartum period lasts from 7 days after birth to 6 weeks following childbirth. The late postpartum period begins at 6 weeks and continues for up to 1 year, or until the woman’s body completely returns to its non-pregnant state. Postpartum depression can occur during any of these stages, but it most often begins in the first few months after delivery.

Postpartum Depression (PPD) is a type of clinical depression that can affect both sexes after childbirth, though it occurs more frequently in females than males. Postpartum depression can cause sadness, fatigue, anxiety, weight changes, trouble sleeping and concentrating. Postpartum Depression affects about 15-20% of mothers within the first three months

Postpartum Depression Treatment Facility and Co-Occuring Issues

When a woman is suffering from postpartum depression, she may be more likely to self-medicate. Also, women may experience symptoms of anxiety. One study found that nearly two-thirds of women with postpartum depression also experience an anxiety disorder. Postpartum depression treatment can be necessary for cases suffering from deep depression.

postpartum depression treatment
To learn more about Postpartum Depression Treatment, call us at We Level Up FL Mental Health Center

Where there are co-occurring multiple disorders Postpartum Depression Treatment requires more sophisticated specialists able to recognize and treat the entire of all the disorders for long-term recovery. Mothers who develop postpartum depression may be less likely to seek treatment. This is because many women are embarrassed to admit that they are suffering from severe postpartum depression. Thankfully, this is starting to change as there is now greater awareness and understanding of this condition.

According to SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration) [2], as many as 15% of women suffering from postpartum depression engage in binge drinking within a year of giving birth. Women battling postpartum depression who drink to cope greatly increase the risk of exposing their children to alcohol poisoning. Hence, alcohol can pass from mother to child during breastfeeding and studies have shown that this can stunt a baby’s growth.

We Level Up Mental Health Center has trained counselors that are qualified to provide Postpartum Depression Treatment. Lean on us to get the help you deserve to care for you and your baby. Call to learn more about Postpartum Depression Treatment options suitable for your circumstances.

Sources

[1] NCBI – https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3039003/

[2] SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration) – https://www.samhsa.gov/grants/grant-announcements/ti-14-005